The Fallenposters Blog

Because the posters fell down, duh.

Happy, or should it be, Merry 4th of July!

with 3 comments

What determines whether or not we say “Happy” or “Merry” in front of the name of a holiday or occasion? We say, Happy New Year’s, Happy Birthday, Happy Father’s and Mother’s Day. But why do we say Merry Christmas. Is that the only time we tend to use “Merry” in conjunction with a holiday or occasion?

I almost never hear anyone say “Merry New Year” or “Happy Christmas” (even though I’ll say it myself just to convince myself that I’m witty). But then there are occasions and holidays that you almost never hear anyone say “Happy” or “Merry” anything. Such as Labor Day, Columbus Day, President’s Day, Veteran’s Day, Memorial Day, etc.

Why do these holiday’s get snuffed? Most of us get the day off from work for these anyway. But you don’t hear anyone going around yelling “Happy Labor Day! You can wear white now!”


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Written by Eric Spiegel

July 4, 2006 at 9:58 am

Posted in grab bag

Tagged with ,

3 Responses

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  1. It’s Happy Christmas in the UK — and half and half in Canada.

    doth

    July 5, 2006 at 11:58 am

  2. on the money again bruv

    garyM

    January 25, 2007 at 12:58 am

  3. I think “happy holidays” carries with it a hidden agenda in singling out one holiday for generic treatment. …sort of like “take that” with a smile. I recommend the following post, which I enjoyed: http://deligentia.wordpress.com/2009/11/29/happy-holidays-as-a-weapon/

    euandus2

    November 30, 2009 at 8:15 pm


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